Envornmental Poster: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Summary

This week, we will be illustrating an environmental posters about recycling. It will be titled: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Your ideas can be original and creative as long as it communicates a message to reduce waste. 

What you need

  • large sketchpad
  • pencils, eraser and permenent markers
  • pastel, markers and crayons

Brainstorming Questions

  1. What are some different recycling categories? ie. plastic, paper, vinyl, glass, cans, food waste, etc.
  2. Name some household products at your home that can be recycled? ie. milk cartons, paper, food wrappers, plastic bags, yogurt bottle, etc.
  3. How can our environment benefit from recycling waste?

What you do

  1. Design several 2-4 thumbnail sketches of your poster. Be creative and original with your concept. 
  2. Choose the idea you like most and refine it. Include titles, words and phrases. Roughly colour your sketch.
  3. Transfer you idea onto a large sketch pad in pencil.  
  4. Outline your pencil lines with a black permanent marker. 
  5. Colour your final artwork with pastels and crayons.  

Drawing a Room in One-Point Perspective

Summary

Perspective is a fundamental principle in art and is applied to many types of artwork. In this lesson we will learn how to draw a room interior in one-point perspective. Drawing in perspective may seem awkward at first but you will get more comfortable with it with practice. Before drawing our rooms, we will review some basic drawing principles and terminology.

Terminology

  • horizon line
  • vanishing point
  • eye level
  • guideline
  • cube
  • cylinder
  • sphere
  • ellipse
  • vertical line and horizontal line

What you need

  • Sketchpad
  • pencil
  • eraser
    Room interior drawing in one-point perspective by Richard Lee

    Room interior drawing in one-point perspective by Richard Lee

    What you do

    1. We will first review some basic terms for perspective drawing: horizon line, vanishing point, eye level, guideline, cube, cylinder, sphere, ellipse, ground, sky, vertical line and horizontal line.
    2. Draw a cube in one-point perspective, then draw the same cube in different distances. ie near, far and floating. *Remember to sketch your construction lines lightly and later darken the lines of your subject.
    3. After drawing the cubes, draw other basic shapes in perspective such as cylinders and spheres. 
    4. If you have mastered drawing these forms, try drawing more complex objects such as a car, chair or cup.
    5. Finally draw your room interior.  You may draw a room from your imagination or use photo reference. You may also draw our studio classroom. 
    Drawing in one point perspective overview

    Drawing in one point perspective overview

    Designing and Constructing a Mask

    Summary

    In this lesson, you will design and construct your own masks. This activity will stretch you. It requires a lot of planning to construct a mask into the idea you have envisioned. Get ready for a fun and rewarding challenge!

    What you need

    • sketchbook and pencil
    • construction paper
    • markers, crayons
    • scissors, knife
    • glue gun, glue stick
    • cutting matt
    IMG_9330.JPG

    What you do

    1. First you will decide on a mask to make from several themes. 
    2. Draw and colour several quick sketches to visualize what your mask will look like.
    3. Design and plan the different components of your mask with construction paper.  
    4. Start cutting and gluing the pieces together.
    5. Add smaller details with markers.  

    Mask Themes 

    • Animal theme: Lion, Tiger, Bear, Zebra, Rhino, Dinosaur. 
    • Halloween theme: Vampire, Mummy, Bat, Frankenstein, Ferry. 
    • Superhero theme: Spider-Man, Hulk, Iron-Man, Batman, Captain America. etc.

    Popcorn Colour Designs

    Summary

    We will be making designs with Popcorn Colour Pens.  Popcorn Colours are colour pens with ink that puff-up, like popcorn, after applying heat to them with a hair dryer. Your design themes can be about seasons, animals, flowers, insects, dinosaurs or anything else you can imagine.  

    What you need

    • popcorn colour pens
    • craft paper
    • pencil
    • sketchbook
    • hair dryer

    What you do

    1. First, test out the popcorn pens on a piece of scrap paper to get a feel of what they are like. 
    2. Brainstorm and sketch thumbnails for your card design. 
    3. Lightly sketch your layout onto coloured paper.
    4. Trace and colour in all the areas with Popcorn Colour Pens.
    5. After you have finished, blow dry your designs and watch your designs puff-up.  
    6. Repeat the process and make another design! :)
    Popcorn Colour (1).jpg

    Drawing Different Facial Expressions

    Summary

    In this lesson we will learn how to draw facial expressions. In art, the subject matter is often people, so knowing how to visually communicate a range different human emotions are essential.

    Feelings and Emotions

    • happiness
    • sadness
    • anger
    • love
    • exhaustion
    • illness
    • boredom
    • confusion
    • pride
    • shame
    • fear
    • surprise
    • shock
    • pain
    • pleasure
    • stress
    • excitement
    • disgust

    What you do

    1. In a group, make a list of different feeling and emotions.  
    2. Draw a grid with spaces that are 5x5 cm square. 
    3. Inside each individual square draw a head expressing a different emotion. Label each emotion.
    4. Ink and colour each drawing. 
    5. How do you feel right now? Draw yourself expressing how you feel at this moment. 

    Create Miniature Worlds With Line Clay

    Summary

    Children will make miniature worlds using Line Clay. Line Clay is string-like clay that can be bent, coiled or sculpted like a metal wire. The children will choose a theme and build miniatures related to it. They will also build three dimensional environments that correlate with their themes.  

    Themes for your miniatures

    • dinosaurs
    • sea life
    • soldiers
    • wild animals
    • furniture
    • plants

    What you need

    • line clay
    • construction paper
    • glue stick
    • scissors
    • crayons
    • pencils

     

    What you do

    1. Since line clay is doesn't stick together as easily as other kinds of clay, we will use one line of clay for each miniature sculpture.  
    2. Select a single line clay colour for your sculpture and mould it as if you were bending a metal coat hanger.  
    3. After you have completed sculpting  a few miniatures, work on a background that correlates with your theme.  Use cardboard and construction paper to build a three dimensional environments for your miniatures. 
    4. Place your miniatures into your environments and play. Make a narrative for your miniature world. 
    5. Optional: Narrate and film a story. 

    Ink and Watercolour Designs

    Summary

    In this lesson we will be inking and painting designs with markers and watercolour paint. Their designs can be related to typography, an animation character, scenery or an abstract design. They will first draw there ideas in pencil. Next they will ink their designs with markers and paint them

    What is watercolour paint?

    Watercolour paint is a transparent painting medium known for its bright and vibrant colours. It is made by mixing colour pigments with a binder. The paint is diluted with water and before it is applied onto paper. The water then evaporates and the binder fixes the pigment to the paper. 

    What you need

    • pencils
    • rulers
    • sketch pad
    • permanent markers
    • watercolour paint
    0546f53650d44ac1df17ae16abb8f046.jpg

    What you do

    1. Draw out four 10 x 10 squares in your sketchbook and ink the backgrounds with black markers.
    2. Draw your design within the boxes. It can be a typography font, cartoon, scenery or an abstract design.
    3. Ink your designs with black markers to make pleasing contrast.
    4. Paint your designs with watercolour paint.

    Mini Story Book

    Summary

    In this lesson students will learn how to write and illustrate a storybook. It can a fictional story or a journal about their week. This is a simple activity meant to get children familiar with process of making a storybook. They will also make a short video narration of their story.  

    What you need

    • markers
    • pens
    • paper
    • pencils
    • glue
    • constuction paper

     

    What you do

    1.  Students will fold a sheet of A4 paper into 1/8 and cut the centre to make a foldable book.
    2. They will sketch a rough outline of their story onto each page while leaving space for the text.
    3. Next they will refine and illustrate their stories with pencil.
    4. Once the students are satisfied with their story and drawings, they will colour them.
    5. Next they will choose a sheet of coloured paper and fold the paper into the same book format.
    6. Last, they will cut out each page of their book illustrations and paste them onto the into the pages of the coloured book.  
    7. After the students have completed their books, they will narrate their stories on video.  

    Glass Decco

    Summery

    In this activity the students will create beautiful stained glass artwork with Glass Deco. This activity requires the students to fine-tune their motor skills by squeezing the right amount of paint from a tube and painting inside of the lines. They can make their own creative designs or follow a pre-existing template.  

    What you need

    • Pencil
    • Sketchbooks
    • Permanent black marker
    • Markers
    • Glass Deco
    • Acetate Film
    • Pre-existing templates designs

    What you do

    1. Sketch a design for your glass deco art. Be imaginative with your ideas and choice of colour. If you need some inspiration, look through (or use) other pre-existing designs. 
    2. Choose an idea that you like the most and outline it with a black permanent marker and colour it. The design should be no bigger 10 x 10 centimeters square.
    3. Place a sheet of clear acetate over your design and trace the outlines with black glass deco paint.
    4. After you are finished, put it aside and allow the black lines to dry.
    5. While is it drying, make another design repeating steps 1-4.  
    6. Once you have completed the steps, return to your first design and check if it has dried by touching it gently with your finger.
    7. If it is dry, paint the colours within the black lines. Refer back to your rough design. 
    8. Repeat steps 6 & 7 for your second design.  

    Writing a Screenplay for Film

    Summary

    In this lesson we are writing screenplays using the clay characters that made from last class. We will later use our screenplay to shoot a short film using our characters. 

    Did you know

    Screenplays are used to make movies, cartoons, video games, television, documentaries, commercials, theater, comic books and more. I found myself using screenplay writing to plan presentations for the classroom and for work.  

     Lawrence Kasdan longhand script for The Empire Strikes Back 

     Lawrence Kasdan longhand script for The Empire Strikes Back 

    What you do

    1. Character Profile Write a profile for each of your characters. What are their names, interests and personalities like? The more you can write about them the better.  
    2. Plot Develop the story by roleplaying with your characters in the scenes. 
    3. Write Start writing the dialogue for each scene. Have one of the students (or teacher) write down the script. 
    4. Rehearse Practice rehearsing with your characters and edit the script.
    5. Filming Shoot the screenplay and remember to have FUN!

     

    Popsicle Stick Characters

    Summary

    This week the lesson focus will be on character creation.  Character design and modeling is an important component of animation. Animators require a three-dimensional concept of their subject matter in order to animate them convincingly.  Students will first conceptualize their characters on paper and later model their characters with clay. If time permits, we can film a short story with our characters. 

    What you need

    • Clay
    • popsicle sticks
    • wiggly eyes
    • sculpting utensils
    • white glue
    • pencils, markers and sketchpad
    Chicken on a stick by Aara

    Chicken on a stick by Aara

    What you do

    1. Concept Design First design your characters in your sketchbook and colour them with pencils and markers. Design the popsicle sticks as well.  
    2. Popsicle Stick Before you start sculpting, draw your popsicle stick designs.
    3. Clay Select the colours you require and knead your clay. Try sculpting various three-dimensional shapes such as a ball, a cylinder, a cone and cube.
    4. Sculpt Begin sculpting your characters. Mold several small pieces and combine them to form your character.
    5. Wiggly Eyes Last, glue on wiggly eyes.

    Typography: Word Expression

    Summary

    In this lesson we will select a word and make a visual representation of it. We will design a word in a way that expresses it's meaning by choosing a suitable font, playing with the arrangement of the letters and manipulating the typeface. 

    Understanding typography design can help you make power points for school, design a personal website or create your business identity. It's handy skill to have!  

    What is Typography?

    Typography is the art of making written text visually appealing, expressive and legible. Typography design includes the selection of fonts and modifying it's size, colour, letter spacing and layout.

    Examples of various word expression designs.

    Examples of various word expression designs.

    Use colour to enhance the visual meaning of the word.  

    Use colour to enhance the visual meaning of the word.  

    What you need

    • pencils
    • sketch pad
    • markers

    Here are a list of words you can choose from: angry, sad, cold, hungry, mad, happy, sick, strong, thin, hard, soft, ugly, pretty, soft, light, thing, heavy, old, free, etc.. You may also use other words that are not on the list.  

    What you do

    1. Select a word that you would like to design.
    2. Draw several thumbnail sketches of your word design. Play around with the font style, thickness of the lines and the arrangement of the letters.
    3. Get feedback from your classmates. Choose the ideas that you like the most and develop them further.
    4. Progress to colouring your designs. Remember to choose colours that best conveys the meaning of your word.
    5. Once you are finished, explain the reasoning for your design to the class.  

    Magazine Collage Part 2

    Summary

    Students will use torn and cut up pieces of magazine pages to create colourful collages or paper mosaics. In the 2nd part of the lesson, we will first browse through magazines to find images that closely match the colours in our rough designs. We will then cut, tear and paste the magazines pages onto our final collage.  

    What You Need

    • magazines or photos
    • scissors
    • bristol board paper
    • pencils and markers
    • glue stick
    • paint

    What You Do:

    1. Make sure you have transferred the outline drawing of your sketch on to large bristol board.  
    2. Browse through magazines to find pages that match the colour of your rough design.
    3. Start tearing and cutting  pieces of magazine paper and paste them within the lines of your drawings. Make sure to match the colours of area to your rough design as closely as possible. 
    4. Refer back to your concept sketch for reference. If some areas don't appear the way you'd like it to,  you can always cut and paste over the area again.  
    A finished magazine collage of a tree.

    A finished magazine collage of a tree.

    Magazine Collage Part 1

    Summary

    Students will use torn and cut up pieces of magazine pages to create colourful collages or paper mosaics. This is a two part lesson. In the first lesson they will brainstorm to make several rough thumbnail sketches of their ideas.

    What You Need

    • magazines or photos
    • scissors
    • bristol board paper
    • pencils and markers
    • glue stick
    • paint

    What You Do:

    1. Sketch and colour several thumbnail designs. Be creative with your ideas.
    2. Choose the design you like best and refine it further with markers. Use solid blocks of colours in your design. 
    3. Transfer your design onto large bristol board paper.
    4. Find pages in your magazines that matches the colour of your design.

    Mosaics

    Mosaics are made of tiny coloured pieces of stone, pottery, glass or other materials, arranged together and set in plaster or cement to make patterns and images. They can be used to decorate a floor, a wall or in some cases a ceiling. Mosaics have a long history. They were created in Ancient times in Babylon, Egypt, Greece and Rome. For several centuries, interest in the making of mosaics declined. It wasn't until the 19th century, when architects started to look at old ideas for new inspirations. Now, once again mosaics are popping up in public buildings and private homes.

    Magazine Collage Examples

    Magazine Collage Examples

    Flip Book

    Summary

    Learn about a fundamental principles of animation and film by making a flip book. A flip book creates the illusion of motion with sequence of static drawings that slightly differ from each other.

    What's an Animator

    Animators are artists that specialize in the process of creating the illusion of motion. The methods include cell animation, stop motion animation, computer animation and more. All of these methods rely on the same fundamental principles used in a flip book. 

    What You Need

    • notepad or post-it
    • markers
    • pencil
    • eraser

    What you Do

    1. Envision your subject and plot. Start by imagining a character that you want to animate. Your character should be something easy to draw such as a stick figure or a simple cartoon.
    2. Draw your subject on the bottom sheet of paper. Use a pencil so that you can fix mistakes easily.
    3. Trace your subject in a slightly different position from the drawing underneath. Repeat this process on each page to animate your characters. Just draw and allow your characters to come act on their own.
    4. Test your flip book. Flip your pages to see if you can make any improvements.
    5. Colour. Colour your characters and add backgrounds.

    Paper Clay Tiles - Painting

    Summary:

    In the second part of the paper clay tile lesson we will paint our paper clay designs using gauche paint (poster colours). 

    What you need:

    • Paper clay
    • markers
    • thick water-based paint (gouache)
    • paintbrushes
    • water containers
    • white glue
    • some newspapers to keep your work area clean
    Paper Clay Tile Sculpture by Aara Lee

    Paper Clay Tile Sculpture by Aara Lee

    What you do:

    1. Refer back to your rough design sketches and select the colours that you will need to paint your sculpture with.  
    2. Paint your sculpture starting with the lighter colours first and darker colours last.   
    3. Use a small round brush for small detail work.
    4. Look over your sculpture to find any area that can be touched up and improved.  

     

    Paper Clay Tiles - Sculpting

    Summary

    Paper clay is lightweight sculpting material that can be moulded and air dried to a hard finish. It is versatile, handling similar to traditional soil clay. Today, students will make three-dimensional paper clay tile designs.  

    What you need

    • paper clay
    • sculpting tools
    • white glue
    • cardboard
    • mineral oil
    • markers & pencils
    • pencil crayons
    Paper Clay Tile Sculpture by Richard Lee

    Paper Clay Tile Sculpture by Richard Lee

    What you do

    1. Think of a theme for your paper clay design. It can be about nature, wildlife, space, dinosaurs, insects or anything you can imagine. 
    2. In pencil, make rough sketches of your 10 x 10 centimetre clay illustration on paper....Be creative!
    3. Colour your design with markers. 
    4. Take your paper clay out of the wrapper. Knead the clay, play with it to get a sense of how to sculpted it.
    5. Start sculpting your design. Refer back to your sketch as you are sculpting. 
    6. Allow your sculpture dry so that it can be painted in the next class. 

    Design Custom Stickers

    Summary

    In this lesson we will make our own custom stickers designs. The students will learn how to conceptualise, plan and create their own sticker designs using a variety of artist materials. 

    What you need   

    • Sticker paper
    • Sketchpad 
    • permanent black pens
    • professional markers, pencil crayons and pens
    • pencil and eraser
    Sticker designs compliments of Louis Vuitton

    Sticker designs compliments of Louis Vuitton

    What you do

    1. Roughly sketch several designs for your stickers.  Be imaginative with your ideas and use of colour, at this early stage you want to let your ideas flow freely. Look to your favorite TV shows, hobbies or magazines to gain inspiration. 
    2. Select the designs that you like and transfer them onto a sheet of sticker paper with pencil. 
    3. Outline your sticker design with permanent black markers and colour them with markers, pens and pencil crayons.  
    Compliments of Louis Vuitton

    Compliments of Louis Vuitton

    Drawing and Designing Cars

    Summary

    This week, we will learn how to draw and design cars. We will conceptualise and draw our own car designs in two-point perspective. The process of drawing a car always starts off with drawing a cube like structure. Parts of the car such as wheels, windows and mirrors are added later to the cube. 

    Cars come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours. It is as much of a fashion statement as it is a means of transportation for people. An essential factor for learning how to draw cars is practice, it is also important to study other car designs and it's mechanics. 

    What you need

    • paper
    • pencil
    • eraser
    • black permanent markers
    • professional markers
    • picture references of cars

     

    What you do

    1. Start by drawing a horizon line across the middle of the page and mark 2 vanishing point on both ends.

    2. Draw a rectangular cube in two-point perspective. This cuboid will indicate the height and width that your car will be encased in. 

    3. Draw the silhouette of your car on both of the long sides of the cuboid.  Mark the points where you will be adding mirrors, headlights and other auto components.  Remember to use your vanishing points to find the correct placements in your drawing.

    4. Draw in all the parts of your car and refine your drawing until it is complete.

    5. Draw another car - be more adventurous in your design.  

    Words

    • perspective - drawing objects to give a realistic impression of their height, width, depth, and position
    • vanishing point  /  VP  -the point at which parallel lines viewed in perspective appear to converge
    • horizon line / eye level - where sky separates from land or water. It is the actual height of the viewer's eyes
    • guideline - a light guideline that helps an artist construct a drawing
    • ellipse - a line drawing of an oval
    • cuboid - a cube like structure
    • silhouette - a dark outline of someone or something visible against a lighter background

    Drawing Buildings in One-Point Perspective

    Summary

    In this lesson we will learn how to draw buildings in one-point perspective. Buildings come in many different shapes and sizes but we will start off with a basic rectangular building with windows. The process involves constructing the basic outer frame of a building, windows and other architectural components.  

    What you need

    • ruler
    • set square
    • paper
    • pencil
    • eraser
    One-point perspective drawing of a building 

    One-point perspective drawing of a building 

    What you do

    1. Horizon Line Begin by drawing horizon line across the middle of the page and mark a vanishing point on the centre of the line.  

    2. Building Frame Draw a rectangle that indicates the height and width of your building.  Draw lines from each of the corners towards the vanishing point. Mark the depth of your building to draw a rectangular cube.  

    3. Windows Now measure and mark the vertical distances of each window of your building on the front edge of your building. Using your set square, draw horizontal lines on the front of you building following the measurement marks. Continue drawing the windows on the side of you building towards the vanishing point.  

    4. Next Building Draw another building and be more adventurous in the design of the building you draw this time.  

    New words

    • perspective grid
    • vanishing point - VP 
    • horizon line - eye level
    • guideline
    • ellipse
    • cube
    • vertical line and horizontal line